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Pressures on youth

UserPost

9:32 pm
August 20, 2009


alex_delarge

Master Shadowvillian

Posts: 3444

11

Post edited 8:34 pm - August 20, 2009 by Xehanort


I like your outlook, but you have to remember, youth is foolish by nature, meaning, his version of “happiness” which, no offense AL, cannot be much more than having fun with the homies and f**king as many fine girls as possible, is most likely miniscule compared to the vision his parents have for him.

So, my whole thing is, should he not honor that vision to a respectable extent? At least until he can produce an adequate vision for himself.

9:49 pm
August 20, 2009


KoreanNuke of Eternal Conflict

Master Shadowvillian

Posts: 3491

LA DownTown

12

lol i just wanna get the f**k out my house asap so i dont have to hear my mom nagging or tellin me to gtf off the computer or bothering me while recording =]

F.Y.L

9:51 pm
August 20, 2009


Mr. AL

Master Shadowvillian

Posts: 4519

British Columbia, Canada

13

lol so much negativity to a joke.

I f**kin love sports, the only person pressuring was me.

Just checkin to see what people would say if “hey, what if I WAS overly pressured by people for sports? funny idea”

Slap my dick on her cheek and tell her to wake up, smearing cemen on her face like it was her makeup

9:54 pm
August 20, 2009


Fims of Neurominded

Shadowvillian

Posts: 1441

14

my parents/cousins/aunts think im a fag cus i can't get a girlfriend.

Douche In Training

9:57 pm
August 20, 2009


Diogenes

Veteran

Posts: 338

Des Moines

15

Post edited 8:59 pm - August 20, 2009 by Diogenes


well, I don't know the whole situation, but I do know this: sports rarely bring anyone long-term happiness. In fact, even something which seems so solid a vision, such as pushing a child to go to college, can be detrimental. Adults may have the experience and wisdom to chart a path which they see as good. Seldom, though, do they understand the complexities of individuality enough to realize that their own goals and values may have long ago exited the soul of their child. Perhaps I, as a student of philosophy, would naturally push my son or daughter to excel in the arts, the humanities, the languages and cultures. But maybe my son, from some unforseen circumstance or sequence of experiences, developed an interest in working with his hands. Should I urge him to drop his love of building construction and pressure him to succeed in an academic setting? Should I make him feel as if knowledge is the only useful pursuit, when really, happiness bears its fruit in many forms? Is it right for him to feel suffocated by my inability to cope with his dissent from my teachings? No.

But I see your point. Maybe he does just want to party and chase girls. Or maybe he wants to spend his time on music, instead of sports. Maybe these pressures he feels from parents and other relatives are actually selfish on their part, not wholly intended to better him as a person. These things we do not know. Regardless, if he's old enough to question these things, he's old enough to decide for himself what makes him happy. The turning-point into adulthood occurs at different stages in life for different people. The cut-off is not a mandatory 18 years old. So, Al, if you know what you want in life, go get it. Don't ever feel like you need permission from your parents to do what you love.


edit: haha and I can see now my advice falls on barren ground. nonetheless, it's always good to mold one's ideas into concrete language instead of these fleeting thoughts.

http://www.myspace.com/diogenesofdesmoines

9:58 pm
August 20, 2009


Mr. AL

Master Shadowvillian

Posts: 4519

British Columbia, Canada

16

fims said:

my parents/cousins/aunts think im a fag cus i can't get a girlfriend.


you'll get there. just give it time.

and ALSO… so if I was actually bothered by what my parents would pressure me to do, would that make me the same as other teens on the streets and what not? Nope. Everyone is different, everyone deals with bulls**t in their own way in their mind… Some find ways to thwart tho obstacles and overcome them. others stare at the opposing struggle as an impassible mountain and a yeti chasing after them.. Lol I dunno just an example.

But yeah.

Everyone deals with s**t differently. Me, to be honest, if I were living on the streets or some s**t… I'd be dead.

Slap my dick on her cheek and tell her to wake up, smearing cemen on her face like it was her makeup

10:01 pm
August 20, 2009


Mr. AL

Master Shadowvillian

Posts: 4519

British Columbia, Canada

17

Diogenes said:

well, I don't know the whole situation, but I do know this: sports rarely bring anyone long-term happiness. In fact, even something which seems so solid a vision, such as pushing a child to go to college, can be detrimental. Adults may have the experience and wisdom to chart a path which they see as good. Seldom, though, do they understand the complexities of individuality enough to realize that their own goals and values may have long ago exited the soul of their child. Perhaps I, as a student of philosophy, would naturally push my son or daughter to excel in the arts, the humanities, the languages and cultures. But maybe my son, from some unforseen circumstance or sequence of experiences, developed an interest in working with his hands. Should I urge him to drop his love of building construction and pressure him to succeed in an academic setting? Should I make him feel as if knowledge is the only useful pursuit, when really, happiness bears its fruit in many forms? Is it right for him to feel suffocated by my inability to cope with his dissent from my teachings? No.

But I see your point. Maybe he does just want to party and chase girls. Or maybe he wants to spend his time on music, instead of sports. Maybe these pressures he feels from parents and other relatives are actually selfish on their part, not wholly intended to better him as a person. These things we do not know. Regardless, if he's old enough to question these things, he's old enough to decide for himself what makes him happy. The turning-point into adulthood occurs at different stages in life for different people. The cut-off is not a mandatory 18 years old. So, Al, if you know what you want in life, go get it. Don't ever feel like you need permission from your parents to do what you love.


I don't know what I want in life.

What is it? We're all going to die eventually…so why work towards nothing? Why covet things that others may have and aspire to achieve greatness when eventually you will come across mortality and sink in soil?

Slap my dick on her cheek and tell her to wake up, smearing cemen on her face like it was her makeup

10:05 pm
August 20, 2009


Fims of Neurominded

Shadowvillian

Posts: 1441

18

Mr. AL of The Storm Squad said:

Diogenes said:

well, I don't know the whole situation, but I do know this: sports rarely bring anyone long-term happiness. In fact, even something which seems so solid a vision, such as pushing a child to go to college, can be detrimental. Adults may have the experience and wisdom to chart a path which they see as good. Seldom, though, do they understand the complexities of individuality enough to realize that their own goals and values may have long ago exited the soul of their child. Perhaps I, as a student of philosophy, would naturally push my son or daughter to excel in the arts, the humanities, the languages and cultures. But maybe my son, from some unforseen circumstance or sequence of experiences, developed an interest in working with his hands. Should I urge him to drop his love of building construction and pressure him to succeed in an academic setting? Should I make him feel as if knowledge is the only useful pursuit, when really, happiness bears its fruit in many forms? Is it right for him to feel suffocated by my inability to cope with his dissent from my teachings? No.

But I see your point. Maybe he does just want to party and chase girls. Or maybe he wants to spend his time on music, instead of sports. Maybe these pressures he feels from parents and other relatives are actually selfish on their part, not wholly intended to better him as a person. These things we do not know. Regardless, if he's old enough to question these things, he's old enough to decide for himself what makes him happy. The turning-point into adulthood occurs at different stages in life for different people. The cut-off is not a mandatory 18 years old. So, Al, if you know what you want in life, go get it. Don't ever feel like you need permission from your parents to do what you love.


I don't know what I want in life.

What is it? We're all going to die eventually…so why work towards nothing? Why covet things that others may have and aspire to achieve greatness when eventually you will come across mortality and sink in soil?


then why not commit suicide if that's what how you feel about life.

I'm probably the only atheist in my family, so when they ask me s**t like “well go kill yourself you have no reason to live,” it pisses me off. I want to live because life is beautiful and there's things out there that i want to experience. I want to experience the most i can out of life. That itself should be enough motivation to do things and try to find yourself!

Douche In Training

10:07 pm
August 20, 2009


Mr. AL

Master Shadowvillian

Posts: 4519

British Columbia, Canada

19

fims said:

Mr. AL of The Storm Squad said:

Diogenes said:

well, I don't know the whole situation, but I do know this: sports rarely bring anyone long-term happiness. In fact, even something which seems so solid a vision, such as pushing a child to go to college, can be detrimental. Adults may have the experience and wisdom to chart a path which they see as good. Seldom, though, do they understand the complexities of individuality enough to realize that their own goals and values may have long ago exited the soul of their child. Perhaps I, as a student of philosophy, would naturally push my son or daughter to excel in the arts, the humanities, the languages and cultures. But maybe my son, from some unforseen circumstance or sequence of experiences, developed an interest in working with his hands. Should I urge him to drop his love of building construction and pressure him to succeed in an academic setting? Should I make him feel as if knowledge is the only useful pursuit, when really, happiness bears its fruit in many forms? Is it right for him to feel suffocated by my inability to cope with his dissent from my teachings? No.

But I see your point. Maybe he does just want to party and chase girls. Or maybe he wants to spend his time on music, instead of sports. Maybe these pressures he feels from parents and other relatives are actually selfish on their part, not wholly intended to better him as a person. These things we do not know. Regardless, if he's old enough to question these things, he's old enough to decide for himself what makes him happy. The turning-point into adulthood occurs at different stages in life for different people. The cut-off is not a mandatory 18 years old. So, Al, if you know what you want in life, go get it. Don't ever feel like you need permission from your parents to do what you love.


I don't know what I want in life.

What is it? We're all going to die eventually…so why work towards nothing? Why covet things that others may have and aspire to achieve greatness when eventually you will come across mortality and sink in soil?


then why not commit suicide if that's what how you feel about life.

I'm probably the only atheist in my family, so when they ask me s**t like “well go kill yourself you have no reason to live,” it pisses me off. I want to live because life is beautiful and there's things out there that i want to experience. I want to experience the most i can out of life. That itself should be enough motivation to do things and try to find yourself!


because it's already been tried, and I'm finding it kinda useless. I believe suicide halts all the struggles you have at the moment and you go in a state of dreaming where you re-live those struggles continuously.

Slap my dick on her cheek and tell her to wake up, smearing cemen on her face like it was her makeup

10:10 pm
August 20, 2009


Fims of Neurominded

Shadowvillian

Posts: 1441

20

Mr. AL of The Storm Squad said:

fims said:

Mr. AL of The Storm Squad said:

Diogenes said:

well, I don't know the whole situation, but I do know this: sports rarely bring anyone long-term happiness. In fact, even something which seems so solid a vision, such as pushing a child to go to college, can be detrimental. Adults may have the experience and wisdom to chart a path which they see as good. Seldom, though, do they understand the complexities of individuality enough to realize that their own goals and values may have long ago exited the soul of their child. Perhaps I, as a student of philosophy, would naturally push my son or daughter to excel in the arts, the humanities, the languages and cultures. But maybe my son, from some unforseen circumstance or sequence of experiences, developed an interest in working with his hands. Should I urge him to drop his love of building construction and pressure him to succeed in an academic setting? Should I make him feel as if knowledge is the only useful pursuit, when really, happiness bears its fruit in many forms? Is it right for him to feel suffocated by my inability to cope with his dissent from my teachings? No.

But I see your point. Maybe he does just want to party and chase girls. Or maybe he wants to spend his time on music, instead of sports. Maybe these pressures he feels from parents and other relatives are actually selfish on their part, not wholly intended to better him as a person. These things we do not know. Regardless, if he's old enough to question these things, he's old enough to decide for himself what makes him happy. The turning-point into adulthood occurs at different stages in life for different people. The cut-off is not a mandatory 18 years old. So, Al, if you know what you want in life, go get it. Don't ever feel like you need permission from your parents to do what you love.


I don't know what I want in life.

What is it? We're all going to die eventually…so why work towards nothing? Why covet things that others may have and aspire to achieve greatness when eventually you will come across mortality and sink in soil?


then why not commit suicide if that's what how you feel about life.

I'm probably the only atheist in my family, so when they ask me s**t like “well go kill yourself you have no reason to live,” it pisses me off. I want to live because life is beautiful and there's things out there that i want to experience. I want to experience the most i can out of life. That itself should be enough motivation to do things and try to find yourself!


because it's already been tried, and I'm finding it kinda useless. I believe suicide halts all the struggles you have at the moment and you go in a state of dreaming where you re-live those struggles continuously.


I see no point in suicide either, as much as i think about it. Life is what you make it is what i've learned!

Douche In Training